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The Lord has brought me Home
I composed The Lord Has Brought Me Home in New York City in 2015. This piece was commissioned by the St. Luke’s Episcopal Church Choir, San Francisco, CA, USA. This piece sounds like a hymn with a jazzy approach. Originally, it was written for SATB choir, jazz trio, trombone and alto saxophone.
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$2.00
Bubbles
“Bubbles” was composed in New York City in 2014. The text is an attempt to compare life with a bubble. A bubble has a brief life, and during its journey can meet other bubbles, can be taken anywhere by the wind, can hover high or low, fast or slow, and all of a sudden can simply “die”. So as our lives. The message is to live your life now, because it is short. The texture is varied with distinct moments of vocal representations of bubbles, male and female choirs, double mixed choir, improvisation based on real bubbles and changes on keys, dynamics, rhythms, and tempos. The piece can also be performed without the improvisation part. Note to performers This work requires the production of bubbles at two points: between letters F and G and again at the end of the work. To produce bubbles, one may use a bubble machine, a children's toy, or anything capable of producing many bubbles quickly. In the score, directions to make bubbles are indicated with an arrow. Anyone may create these bubbles: the conductor, singers, and/or members of the audience - one person or many.
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$5.00
The Five Stages of Loss
“The 5 Stages of Loss” was composed in New York City in 2014. I based the idea of this song cycle on the attempt to express each of the emotional stages that someone may experience when faced with impending death or death of a beloved one. The five stages are Denial, Anger, Bargaining, Depression, and Acceptance. Those emotional stages together are known as the KüblerRoss model. This model was first introduced by Swiss-American Psychiatrist Elisabeth KüblerRoss in her 1969 book, “On Death and Dying,” and was inspired by her work with terminally ill patients. I wrote one song per emotional stage, and I wrote the texts based on what someone experiencing one of those stages may feel, think, and say. In honor to all of those who are gone, I dedicate this work to all of those who lost someone in their lives. Each movement can be performed separately, and the order can be different from the order on the score. However, I would like to suggest that any performance of this work begins with the conductor announcing a minute silence in honor to all of those who are already gone. At that moment, everyone in the choir and in the audience is invited to think about any loss that may have experienced in their lives.
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$7.50
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